The 1851 Town Plan – Warrington’s North-west Quarter (part two)

Warrington’s North west Quarter (part one)

Warrington’s Railway, Bewsey Street and Early Industry

Just beyond the Market Place, north of Peter Street, there is a sudden shift. In 1465, the long gardens of the houses on the north side of the Market Place backed onto a ‘great heath’ with a windmill, that over two hundred years later was still there. By 1851 though, this large, open, unencumbered space had proved perfect for industrial development, and the Town Plan shows its lower end as home to the large ‘Market Street File and Tool Manufactory’ and the Corn Hill Wire Works. The different types of housing around Queen Street, at the very top of King Street, are presumably for the various grades of workers in the factories.

A big open space behind the houses of Queen Street is marked on later maps as ‘Fairground’. The lords of Warrington were given the right to hold an annual summer fair in 1255 and a second autumn fair in 1277. Originally held in the wide space of Church Street, the summer fair, at least, was still going strong until the mid-nineteenth century, when it was banned from Church Street for continually ending in a drunken riot, presumably being transferred here as a less controversial space. It was still in existence in 1907, but I’m not sure if it still is today or whether it survives in a different incarnation.

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The 1851 Town Plan – Warrington’s South-west Quarter

Warrington’s South east Quarter

In the area to the South-west, between Bridge Street and Sankey Street, the medieval town extends west across Bridge Street as far as modern-day Barbauld Street, before giving way to orchards and gardens and then open countryside. A distillery, tucked away in a courtyard near the Eagle and Child Inn, is the original site of the renowned Warrington gin the basis of the famous Greenall‘s brewing empire.

The bottom corner towards Bridge Foot, the site of the Austin (Augustinian) Friary, founded around 1280 and a later casualty of Henry VIII’s Reformation, is now punctuated with small-scale industrial works: Jolley’s File Manufactory, Friar’s Green Cotton Manufactory, Friar’s Green Old Tannery and Friar’s Green Saw Mills. To the left of these are signs of eighteenth-century development, including the lovely houses of Stanley Street, designed by the famous Warrington painter and engraver, Hamlet Winstanley. A rented building on Friar’s Green is the earlier home of the Warrington Library, started by the Presbyterian minister Dr John Seddon, later founder of the Warrington Academy, in 1760. It was amalgamated with the Natural History Society’s Museum in 1848, the same year it was taken over by the newly-fledged Warrington Corporation to become the first municipal library in Britain. Continue reading

Background to Warrington – A Look at the 1851 Town Plan

Warrington’s South-east Quarter

From Roman times to the thirteenth century, the North/South crossing point of the river was on the south bank at Latchford. The flood plain of Howley Meadows, unsuitable for building, ran up as far as modern-day Parr Street, and the Anglo-Saxon parish church and Norman castle, and subsequent medieval town of Warrington, were built on the higher ground just above it, pretty much in a straight line from the ford. When the bridge across the Mersey replaced the ancient ford crossing, around the middle of the century, the town, which had previously been little more than a single street, extended westwards along to meet it, and then ballooned out to form a new, late-medieval town, centred on the area between the East/West Buttermarket Street and the North/South Newgate, later Bridge Street.

The 1851 Town Plan shows the town still pretty much in its medieval form, but on the very cusp of change. Four streets run along the compass points, dividing the town into quarters and meeting at the broad opening of Market Gate. From the parish church, now at the far east of the town, to Buttermarket Street, a single row of buildings lines the south side of Church Street on burgage plots, which run back to gardens and orchards, and then open countryside. A school for Clergy Daughters has taken the place of the castle and a National School, built in 1833, sits next to the seventeenth-century Marquis of Granby Inn. On the higher ground to the North, additional small streets thread the gardens and orchards behind the buildings along the road, and the Grammar School, founded 1526, is still going strong over three hundred years later.

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